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Alternate 'Amazing Spider-Man' Suits


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As you can see in the images, a couple of the suits made some serious aesthetic changes to Spidey's eyes, but we think the final suit did it right, and the sequel gives him some buggier ones. But the coolest suit is the one that actually uses the webbing under the armpits, a staple of some of the designs in the comic books. In the end, the new suit wasn't much different, though it did have the texture of a basketball. These other designs look like a futuristic Spider-Man from space. We're not sure if all the designs are metallic because that's how they originally wanted the suit to appear, or if that's just how the computer renderings look.

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is directed by Marc Webb and written by Jeff Pinker, Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman. Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) finds, life is busy between taking out the bad guys as Spider-Man and spending time with the person he loves, Gwen (Emma Stone), high school graduation can't come quickly enough. Peter hasn't forgotten the promise he made to Gwen's father to protect her by staying away, but that's a promise he just can't keep. Things will change for Peter when a new villain, Electro (Jamie Foxx), emerges, an old friend, Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan), returns, and Peter uncovers new clues about his past. Sony will release Amazing Spider-Man 2 in theaters next summer on May 2nd, 2014. Excited?



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Click here to view the Original Image Size


Click here to view the Original Image Size

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Record-Breaking Meteorite Crash on Moon Sparks Brightest Lunar Explosion Ever

The high-speed impact of a wayward space rock on the surface of the moon last year triggered the brightest lunar explosion ever seen, scientists say.

Video footage of the record-breaking meteorite strike on the moon, which occurred on Sept. 11, 2013 and was unveiled today (Feb. 24), shows a long flash that was almost as bright as the North Star Polaris. That means the boulder-sized meteorite's lunar crash could have been visible to anyone on Earth who happened to be staring up at the moon at 8:07 p.m. GMT, weather permitting.

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"At that moment I realized that I had seen a very rare and extraordinary event," Jose Madiedo, a professor at the University of Huelva, said in a statement. Madiedo witnessed the collision using two moon-watching telescopes in the south of Spain that are part of the Moon Impacts Detection and Analysis System, or MIDAS observatory. [The Greatest Moon Crashes of All Time]

The space rock hit at a staggering speed of 37,900 mph (61,000 km/h), gouging out a new crater roughly 131 feet (40 meters) wide in an ancient lava-filled lunar basin known as Mare Nubium, Madiedo and colleagues said. The scientists think the boulder behind the crash was about 880 lbs. (400 kg) and measured between 2 and 4.5 feet (0.6 and 1.4 meters) in diameter.

If a space rock this size hit the Earth, it might create some spectacular fireball meteors, but it likely would not pose a threat to people on the ground, researchers explained. But the moon lacks an atmosphere like the one enshrouding our planet, making it quite vulnerable to incoming asteroids.

The energy released by the September 2013 impact was comparable to an explosion of roughly 15 tons of TNT. It was at least three times more powerful than the largest previously observed event — a powerful lunar explosion spotted by NASA scientists on March 17, 2013. During that crash, a space rock hit at an estimated 56,000 mph (90,000 km/h), carving a new crater 65 feet (20 meters) wide.

Typically, the flashes from these impacts last only a fraction of a second, but the bright spot seen by Madiedo glowed for eight seconds, making it the longest observed impact flash. Since 2005, NASA's moon impact-monitoring program has observed more than 300 meteorite strikes on the lunar surface.

"Our telescopes will continue observing the moon as our meteor cameras monitor the Earth's atmosphere," Madiedo said in a statement. "In this way we expect to identify clusters of rocks that could give rise to common impact events on both planetary bodies. We also want to find out where the impacting bodies come from."

The research on the September 2013 lunar impact was unveiled Sunday (Feb. 23) in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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ArnoldC, an Arnold Schwarzenegger-based programming language

Ever wondered why you couldn’t type YOU HAVE BEEN TERMINATED to end a line of code?

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Well now you can, using ArnoldC, an imperative programming language that replaces basic keywords with quotes from various Arnold Schwarzenegger movies. The language is parsed using parboiled and ASM to generate Java bytecode.

Created by programmer lhartikk and hosted on GitHub, ArnoldC re-appropriates the semantics of Arnold’s classic one-liners to “discover new meanings from the Arnold movies with the means of computer science.”

Whether you buy into the philosophy of Arnold’s faithful coding disciple or not, typing HASTA LA VISTA, BABY instead of EndMethodDeclaration is just more fun.

Here’s a rundown of a few of ArnoldC’s keywords:
True: NO PROBLEMO
If: BECAUSE I'M GOING TO SAY PLEASE
EndIf: YOU HAVE NO RESPECT FOR LOGIC
While: STICK AROUND
PlusOperator: GET UP
MinusOperator: GET DOWN
MultiplicationOperator: YOU'RE FIRED
EqualTo: YOU ARE NOT YOU YOU ARE ME
Or: CONSIDER THAT A DIVORCE
DeclareMethod: LISTEN TO ME VERY CAREFULLY
NonVoidMethod: GIVE THESE PEOPLE AIR
MethodArguments: I NEED YOUR CLOTHES YOUR BOOTS AND YOUR MOTORCYCLE
Return: I'LL BE BACK
CallMethod: DO IT NOW
AssignVariableFromMethodCall: GET YOUR ASS TO MARS
BeginMain: IT'S SHOWTIME
EndMain: YOU HAVE BEEN TERMINATED
Print: TALK TO THE HAND
AssignVariable: GET TO THE CHOPPER

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Two researchers send a text message using vodka

Two researchers at York University have worked out a way to communicate between two points using vodka evaporated into the air. They used their system to message the lyrics of “O Canada” between two points, leading them to conclude that in times of need, when there is no cellular reception, it would be possible to text-message using this system.

The authors of the paper, published Thursday, used specific concentration levels of the vodka to represent bits 1 and 0. They wafted the “message” across 12 feet in the lab to the receiving unit, which read out the message as it detected the concentration of vodka in the air rising or falling over time.

The process sounds slow and short-range, but the researchers suggest that it could work for closed environments that don’t have the benefit of a cellular or Wi-Fi signal. They cite the example of the clogged London sewer system as one where robots could have been deployed below ground and have relayed their findings via the molecular communication system.

A third researcher quoted by Eurekalert further suggests that similar systems of molecular communication could be “used to communicate on the nanoscale,” when scientists are, for instance, trying to target drugs or cancer cells inside a human body.

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